DOUGLAS

A-1J Skyrider

1/4

Brand:

Tamiya

Scale:

1:48

Model:

A1J

Painting:

56th Special Operations Wing, 602nd Fighter Squadron, No. 029. 1969, Thailand

Build time:

October 2019 : March 2020

Model No.

3

Aftermarket:

  • Quickboost 48495 A-1 Skyraider Antennas Tamiya

  • Eduard 49296 A-1J TAMIYA

  • Douglas A-1J U.S. Air Force EXPERT kabuki masks

  • Master AM-48-127 A-1 Skyraider

  • Eduard 49009 Remove Before Flight

  • RES/KIT 48-0165 A-1 Skyraider late version wheels set

About aircraft

The Douglas A-1 Skyraider (formerly AD Skyraider) is an American single-seat attack aircraft that saw service between the late 1940s and early 1980s. The Skyraider had a remarkably long and successful career; it became a piston-powered, propeller-driven anachronism in the jet age, and was nicknamed "Spad", after the French World War I fighter.


It was operated by the United States Navy (USN), the United States Marine Corps (USMC), and the United States Air Force (USAF), and also saw service with the British Royal Navy, the French Air Force, the Republic of Vietnam Air Force (RVNAF), and others. It remained in U.S. service until the early 1970s.


The piston-engined Skyraider was designed during World War II to meet United States Navy requirements for a carrier-based, single-seat, long-range, high performance dive/torpedo bomber, to follow-on from earlier types such as the Curtiss SB2C Helldiver and Grumman TBF Avenger. Designed by Ed Heinemann of the Douglas Aircraft Company, prototypes were ordered on 6 July 1944 as the XBT2D-1. The XBT2D-1 made its first flight on 18 March 1945 and in April 1945, the USN began evaluation of the aircraft at the Naval Air Test Center (NATC). In December 1946, after a designation change to AD-1, delivery of the first production aircraft to a fleet squadron was made to VA-19A.


The AD-1 was built at Douglas' El Segundo plant in Southern California. In his memoir The Lonely Sky, test pilot Bill Bridgeman describes the routine yet sometimes hazardous work of certifying AD-1s fresh off the assembly line at a rate of two aircraft per day for delivery to the U.S. Navy in 1949 and 1950.

Gallery